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Prediabetes

Many people have heard about type 2 diabetes, but its common precursor, prediabetes, doesn’t get as much attention. Prediabetes affects about 88 million adults in the US, and an estimated 84% of people with prediabetes don’t know they have it. According to the CDC, 15-30% of these individuals will develop type 2 diabetes within five years. In other words, more than 26 million people that currently live with prediabetes could develop type 2 diabetes by 2026.

New to prediabetes? Check out “Starting Point: What Everyone Needs to Know about Prediabetes,” which answers some of the basics: what is prediabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and more.

For even more, see “Helpful Prediabetes Resources," with links to diaTribe articles focused on prediabetes, diet and nutrition, healthy lifestyle tips, and more.

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