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Prediabetes

Many people have heard about type 2 diabetes, but its common precursor, prediabetes, doesn’t get as much attention. Prediabetes affects about 88 million adults in the US, and an estimated 84% of people with prediabetes don’t know they have it. According to the CDC, 15-30% of these individuals will develop type 2 diabetes within five years. In other words, more than 26 million people that currently live with prediabetes could develop type 2 diabetes by 2026.

New to prediabetes? Check out “Starting Point: What Everyone Needs to Know about Prediabetes,” which answers some of the basics: what is prediabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and more.

For even more, see “Helpful Prediabetes Resources," with links to diaTribe articles focused on prediabetes, diet and nutrition, healthy lifestyle tips, and more.

What's new

exercise guidelines activity benefit

New guidelines by the US Department of Health and Human Services emphasize the benefit of ANY increased physical activity Continue Reading »

diabetes prevention program

Participating in a lifestyle change program could help lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes Continue Reading »

Fresh Food Farmacy Geisinger

Geisinger’s Fresh Food Farmacy provides a “prescription” for healthy food to people with type 2 diabetes who are food insecure; plus, a Q&A with Geisinger Continue Reading »

Test tubes

Why we use A1c, what values are recommended, and what impacts A1c – everything from anemia to vitamins Continue Reading »

The latest evidence on Saxenda shows that three years of treatment with the drug lowers risk for type 2 diabetes by an impressive 79% Continue Reading »

Sugar sweetened beverages

The bold new recommendation for children and their parents Continue Reading »

Prevention, type 2, diabetes, nutrition, health, wellness

Advice for increasing daily activity, the new Fit2Me mobile app, and enthusiasm for the National Diabetes Prevention Program   Continue Reading »

Saxenda, obesity, pre diabetes, GLP-1

Results from the SCALE study show weight loss, delayed onset of type 2 diabetes, and report improved quality of life  Continue Reading »

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