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Prediabetes

Many people have heard about type 2 diabetes, but its common precursor, prediabetes, doesn’t get as much attention. Prediabetes is estimated by CDC to affect 86 million Americans (this includes 51% of people 65 years and older), and an estimated 90% of people with prediabetes don’t even know it. According to the CDC, 15-30% of these individuals will develop type 2 diabetes within five years. In other words, as many as 26 million people that currently have prediabetes could develop type 2 diabetes by 2020, effectively doubling the number of people with type 2 diabetes in the US.

New to prediabetes? Check out “Starting Point: What Everyone Needs to Know about Prediabetes” below, which answers some of the basic questions about prediabetes: what is prediabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and many more!

Want to learn a bit more? See our “Helpful Links” page below, which provides links to diaTribe articles focused on prediabetes, diet and nutrition, healthy lifestyle tips, and more!

Bright Spots & Landmines, diaTribe senior editor Adam Brown's book, has hundreds of food, mindset, exercise, and sleep tips. Get it as a free PDF here or for $6 on Amazon.com.

What's new

What is cholesterol, and when is it “good” or “bad?” What are the cholesterol recommendations for people with diabetes, and how can you keep up healthy cholesterol levels? Continue Reading »

COVID-19 vaccines are being distributed in the United States and in many parts of the world. We’re here to answer questions for people with diabetes. Are the vaccines safe? How do the vaccines work and does it matter which one I get? What are the side effects, and how will the vaccine affect my blood sugar? What can I do after I am vaccinated? Continue Reading »

Average A1C values differ between racial and ethnic groups – people of color have a higher average A1C compared to white people. This is because someone’s A1C value could potentially reflect more than just their average glucose level. A1C values are also influenced by differences in survival rates of red blood cells and how sugar attaches to them.  In addition, because A1C does not provide any specific information about glucose variability or hypoglycemia, it is important to consider using other personalized metrics to better assess diabetes care. Continue Reading »

The RADIANT study aims to define unusual forms of diabetes, to help diagnose and treat these conditions. RADIANT is recruiting people who have been diagnosed with diabetes but don’t fit the usual characteristics of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Continue Reading »

As you look toward staying healthy in the new year, meaningful changes to your diet may help you manage glucose levels and maximize health in the face of COVID-19. Four experts – Whole Cities Foundation’s Dr. Akua Woolbright, low-carb guru Dr. Mariela Glandt, San Francisco General’s Dr. Rita Nguyen, and Harvard’s Dr. Lee Kaplan – shared insights for eating well, finding affordable food, and keeping your body's immune system strong. Continue Reading »

A sibling’s diagnosis of type 1 diabetes inspires a digital company that believes in encouragement, connection, and accountability  Continue Reading »

This National Diabetes Awareness Month, the nation is honoring nurses. In this article, Michael Hattori, a nurse who has type 2 diabetes in remission,  is on his way to becoming a Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist, and he shares advice on managing diabetes and how to work toward better health  Continue Reading »

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