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Prediabetes

Many people have heard about type 2 diabetes, but its common precursor, prediabetes, doesn’t get as much attention. Prediabetes affects about 88 million adults in the US, and an estimated 84% of people with prediabetes don’t know they have it. According to the CDC, 15-30% of these individuals will develop type 2 diabetes within five years. In other words, more than 26 million people that currently live with prediabetes could develop type 2 diabetes by 2026.

New to prediabetes? Check out “Starting Point: What Everyone Needs to Know about Prediabetes,” which answers some of the basics: what is prediabetes, what are its symptoms, how is it treated, and more.

For even more, see “Helpful Prediabetes Resources," with links to diaTribe articles focused on prediabetes, diet and nutrition, healthy lifestyle tips, and more.

What's new

If you have diabetes, one of the best things you can do for your kidney health is to get regular screenings. Learn about the specific tests for chronic kidney disease (CKD), how often you should be tested, and resources to look at if you have been recently diagnosed with CKD. Continue Reading »

At the ADA Postgraduate 2021 virtual conference, Dr. Samuel Dagogo-Jack discussed how intensive lifestyle changes can lead to prediabetes remission and prevent progression to type 2 diabetes. Continue Reading »

Chronic kidney disease is a serious condition that will affect almost 40% of people with diabetes. Actress and dance icon Debbie Allen is partnering with the National Kidney Foundation to raise awareness about this condition, encourage people to be proactive about their health, and prevent diabetes-related health complications. Continue Reading »

Diabetes stigma includes the experiences of exclusion, rejection, prejudice, and blame that some people with diabetes encounter. Learn how to identify this stigma, how it can lead to worse health outcomes, and what you can do to stand up to diabetes stigma. Continue Reading »

What is cholesterol, and when is it “good” or “bad?” What are the cholesterol recommendations for people with diabetes, and how can you keep up healthy cholesterol levels? Continue Reading »

COVID-19 vaccines are being distributed in the United States and in many parts of the world. We’re here to answer questions for people with diabetes. Are the vaccines safe? How do the vaccines work and does it matter which one I get? What are the side effects, and how will the vaccine affect my blood sugar? What can I do after I am vaccinated? Continue Reading »

Average A1C values differ between racial and ethnic groups – people of color have a higher average A1C compared to white people. This is because someone’s A1C value could potentially reflect more than just their average glucose level. A1C values are also influenced by differences in survival rates of red blood cells and how sugar attaches to them.  In addition, because A1C does not provide any specific information about glucose variability or hypoglycemia, it is important to consider using other personalized metrics to better assess diabetes care. Continue Reading »

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