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Exercise

Staying active is important for everyone. For people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, and obesity, exercise plays an even greater role in managing day-to-day health. For those with diabetes, the best thing about exercise is that it can help you keep your blood sugar levels in your target range.

According to US guidelines, all adults should get 150 to 300 minutes each week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (like walking), 75 to 150 minutes each week of vigorous aerobic exercise (like running), or some combination of the two types of exercise. Experts also strongly recommend lifting appropriate-sized weights or doing some form of resistance training.

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