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Medication & Treatment

People with diabetes use many medications to both manage blood sugar levels and also to prevent or treat health complications.

For people with type 1 diabetes, the most important drug is insulin; some people with type 2 diabetes also take insulin. For people with type 2 diabetes, glucose-lowering medications include metformin, sulfonylureas, TZDs, SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and more.

Some of these drugs are injected, others are taken in pill form, and some are even inhaled. Learn about the different treatment options available and which might be best for your lifestyle.

Metformin
Insulin
SGLT-2 inhibitors
GLP-1 agonists
DPP-4 inhibitors
Combination drugs
Sulfonylureas (SFUs)
TZDs

What's new

Provention Bio’s new injectable drug was recommended by an FDA committee for approval on May 25, 2021. Studies show that Teplizumab can delay, for people at risk for type 1, the onset of the condition for two years or more. Learn what happened at the FDA meeting and what might come next. Continue Reading »

Two diabetes devices from Medtronic – a next-gen continuous glucose monitor that removes fingerstick calibrations and a smart insulin delivery pen that keeps track of your insulin doses – will become available in Europe later this year. The two can share data with one another to simplify diabetes management for people on multiple daily injections of insulin. Continue Reading »

Bigfoot Biomedical’s new diabetes management system will provide insulin dosing recommendations based on glucose data and a healthcare professional’s instructions to people with diabetes who take multiple daily injections of insulin. Continue Reading »

New to insulin? Learn about insulin dosing and timing and how often to test your blood sugar levels if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue Reading »

How to recognize and treat severe hypoglycemia quickly – with emergency glucagon – and avoid a trip to the hospital. Continue Reading »

Public speaking professor Alan Uphold shares his experiences with severe low blood sugars and explains why it’s so important to communicate with your loved ones and care-partners about hypoglycemia. Continue Reading »

Now that all adults in the US are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, we encourage everyone, especially people with diabetes or obesity, to get the vaccine as soon as they can. Plus, what does the data show about vaccination so far in the diabetes community? Continue Reading »

New results on Eylea, a treatment for diabetes-related retinopathy, show that the therapy reduces the risk of more serious eye complications when used for prevention. Continue Reading »

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