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Medication & Treatment

People with diabetes use many medications to both manage blood sugar levels and also to prevent or treat health complications.

For people with type 1 diabetes, the most important drug is insulin; some people with type 2 diabetes also take insulin. For people with type 2 diabetes, glucose-lowering medications include metformin, sulfonylureas, TZDs, SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and more.

Some of these drugs are injected, others are taken in pill form, and some are even inhaled. Learn about the different treatment options available and which might be best for your lifestyle.

Metformin
Insulin
SGLT-2 inhibitors
GLP-1 agonists
DPP-4 inhibitors
Combination drugs
Sulfonylureas (SFUs)
TZDs

What's new

Want to learn more about the heart protective effects of statins? Medicines in this class are recommended for many people including those with diabetes and with heart disease or heart disease risk factors. Learn more about the use of these medicines, including effects on lowering cholesterol levels, side effects, and the role of these medicines in supporting heart health and the treatment of heart disease. Continue Reading »

COVID-19 cases are back on the rise. The best way to keep you, your loved ones, and those around you safe and healthy is to get vaccinated. Get our updates on the importance of vaccinations, especially for people with diabetes, COVID variants, vaccine boosters, and how to talk to others about vaccines. Continue Reading »

The FDA recently approved BYDUREON BCise (an extended-release version of the GLP-1 drug, exenatide) for teens with type 2 diabetes. Recently published data shows disturbingly high rates and serious diabetes complications in people who develop type 2 diabetes at a young age suggesting the need for aggressive early treatment and more treatment options.  Continue Reading »

It may not be possible to anticipate every emergency, but for those with diabetes, it’s especially important to prepare for the unexpected. Hear how people with diabetes survived natural disasters, what they learned about planning ahead, and the advice they have for others. Continue Reading »

Medicare has updated its policy to now accept the inhaled insulin Afrezza, as well as injected insulin options to count towards the multiple daily administrations of insulin requirement for glucose monitoring systems coverage. Continue Reading »

The FDA just approved KERENDIA (finerenone) – a brand new drug which has been shown to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease for people with type 2 diabetes. Continue Reading »

What is neuropathy? And more specifically, what is diabetic neuropathy? What are the symptoms and how can you prevent and treat neuropathy? Continue Reading »

Walmart will begin selling ReliOn NovoLog, an analog insulin, to expand the affordability of the drug. Continue Reading »

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