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Medication & Treatment

People with diabetes use many medications to both manage blood sugar levels and also to prevent or treat health complications.

For people with type 1 diabetes, the most important drug is insulin; some people with type 2 diabetes also take insulin. For people with type 2 diabetes, glucose-lowering medications include metformin, sulfonylureas, TZDs, SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and more.

Some of these drugs are injected, others are taken in pill form, and some are even inhaled. Learn about the different treatment options available and which might be best for your lifestyle.

Metformin
Insulin
SGLT-2 inhibitors
GLP-1 agonists
DPP-4 inhibitors
Combination drugs
Sulfonylureas (SFUs)
TZDs

What's new

While diabetes and prediabetes treatments have traditionally focused on managing your glucose, recent research highlights the importance of weight loss in type 2 diabetes prevention, management, and remission. Continue Reading »

Traveling provides very specific challenges for people with diabetes. Alan Uphold shares his experiences traveling, what tools and tricks he uses, and his checklist when planning a vacation. Continue Reading »

As we continue to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic through the fall and winter, it is especially important for you to get both your seasonal flu shot and the COVID-19 booster shot to reduce your chances of getting sick – particularly if you have diabetes.  Continue Reading »

Glucagon is a hormone released by your pancreas that raises the amount of glucose in your blood to help make sure you don’t develop hypoglycemia. Unfortunately, people with type 1 diabetes may have an impaired glucagon response. Researchers are investigating a new medication to stimulate glucagon release, to prevent hypoglycemia for people with type 1 diabetes. Continue Reading »

A clinical trial by Lilly is seeing if your Time in Range could improve from taking Lyumjev, a ultra-rapid mealtime insulin, along with long acting insulin glargine. Continue Reading »

Heart failure is one of the most common diabetes complications. New results from the EMPEROR-Preserved clinical trial show that Jardiance could be the first medication shown to help all people with heart failure. Continue Reading »

If you are currently taking three or more insulin injections per day, you may be eligible to participate in a clinical trial that provides you with the Guardian Connect continuous glucose monitor (CGM) system, InPen smart insulin pen, and smart insulin pen caps. Continue Reading »

Insulin pumps included in the Medtronic MiniMed 600 series and remote controls in the 500 series have been recalled due to a device malfunction that can result in incorrect insulin dosing and cybersecurity risks in the remote controls. If you have one of these devices, stop using immediately and fill out a request form for a free replacement. Continue Reading »

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