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Medication & Treatment

People with diabetes use many medications to both manage blood sugar levels and also to prevent or treat health complications.

For people with type 1 diabetes, the most important drug is insulin; some people with type 2 diabetes also take insulin. For people with type 2 diabetes, glucose-lowering medications include metformin, sulfonylureas, TZDs, SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and more.

Some of these drugs are injected, others are taken in pill form, and some are even inhaled. Learn about the different treatment options available and which might be best for your lifestyle.

Metformin
Insulin
SGLT-2 inhibitors
GLP-1 agonists
DPP-4 inhibitors
Combination drugs
Sulfonylureas (SFUs)
TZDs

What's new

Bigfoot Biomedical’s new diabetes management system will provide insulin dosing recommendations based on glucose data and a healthcare professional’s instructions to people with diabetes who take multiple daily injections of insulin. Continue Reading »

New to insulin? Learn about insulin dosing and timing and how often to test your blood sugar levels if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue Reading »

How to recognize and treat severe hypoglycemia quickly – with emergency glucagon – and avoid a trip to the hospital. Continue Reading »

Public speaking professor Alan Uphold shares his experiences with severe low blood sugars and explains why it’s so important to communicate with your loved ones and care-partners about hypoglycemia. Continue Reading »

Now that all adults in the US are eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine, we encourage everyone, especially people with diabetes or obesity, to get the vaccine as soon as they can. Plus, what does the data show about vaccination so far in the diabetes community? Continue Reading »

New results on Eylea, a treatment for diabetes-related retinopathy, show that the therapy reduces the risk of more serious eye complications when used for prevention. Continue Reading »

Have you or someone you know had trouble affording diabetes care during COVID-19? During the pandemic, healthcare companies have created programs to help people get diabetes medications and devices. More than a year into COVID, which access programs exist, and how long we can expect them to stay in place? Continue Reading »

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has updated its recommendations, encouraging prediabetes and type 2 diabetes screening for people with excess weight or obesity starting at age 35. It also encourages the use of preventive lifestyle interventions when possible. Continue Reading »

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