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Mental Health

Taking care of one’s mental health is equally as important as taking care of one’s physical health – especially for people with diabetes. Diabetes management can be overwhelming and even exhausting at times, and can lead to diabetes distress or fatigue, depression and anxiety, and other emotional health challenges. The shame and blame felt by people with diabetes can also be particularly challenging. Thankfully, you are not alone. The most important thing you can do is advocate for yourself – find a mental health professional and the support system you need on your diabetes journey.

What's new

The Your SAY: Hypoglycemia study is a 30-minute online survey that will help an international research team understand how severe low blood sugar affects quality of life – for people around the world living with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and their loved ones. Continue Reading »

What is resilience and why are people with diabetes better prepared to develop it? Scott Johnson shares what he’s learned about how to build resilience and channel diabetes distress. Continue Reading »

Public speaking professor Alan Uphold shares his experiences with severe low blood sugars and explains why it’s so important to communicate with your loved ones and care-partners about hypoglycemia. Continue Reading »

A fully virtual six-month clinical trial is recruiting 300 people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who are interested in trying continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) with personal support. The study will determine how access to virtual diabetes care with CGM impacts Time in Range (TIR). Continue Reading »

This clinical trial is currently recruiting – participants will be enrolled in one of two stress-intervention courses to measures changes in A1C, diabetes distress, and more. Continue Reading »

This clinical trial is currently recruiting. Families will participate in weekly sessions that focus on topics related to diabetes distress and parent-teen communication, with the hopes of improving Time in Range and lowering A1C levels in the teen with type 1 diabetes.  Continue Reading »

Research shows that changes in Time in Range (TIR) affect your mood and that continuous glucose monitoring may help people with diabetes achieve better emotional health.   Continue Reading »

Living with diabetes is an ever-evolving journey, one that can often lead to feelings of weariness and exhaustion. Scott Johnson shares his own experiences with diabetes fatigue and how he has learned to find strength in his journey and cope when times are tough. Continue Reading »

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