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Research

The latest research in type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, prediabetes, and beyond. Here you’ll find information on experimental therapies, new data and results, and scientific findings.

What's new

Emerging evidence shows that variability in your A1C level may put you at a higher risk of stroke and heart disease.  Continue Reading »

Diabetes increases the risk of severe COVID-19 illness, but does the relationship between diabetes and the virus go in the other direction? Scientists are now studying whether infection with COVID-19 could cause someone to develop diabetes. Continue Reading »

Insulet’s Omnipod 5 automated insulin delivery system was shown to be effective, safe, and easy to use for adults, teens, and children with type 1 diabetes. Early results from a very small group also show Omnipod 5 to be particularly helpful for people with type 2 diabetes. ​ Continue Reading »

GMI provides an estimated A1C level based on continuous glucose monitoring data and can avoid some of the limitations of A1C tests. A recent study compared actual A1C levels with GMI to see how the two compared in the real world. Continue Reading »

Vertex's new cell therapy, made from stem cells, aims to replace insulin-producing cells in people with type 1 diabetes. The therapy will soon begin testing in clinical trials to determine its safety and efficacy. Continue Reading »

To mark the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of insulin, the University of Toronto is hosting a series of presentations and seminars on the latest advances in diabetes treatments. A free, two-day virtual conference in April will feature lectures by more than a dozen experts in diabetes, focusing on the history of insulin, updates in diabetes management, and future research. Continue Reading »

At the ADA Postgraduate 2021 virtual conference, Dr. Samuel Dagogo-Jack discussed how intensive lifestyle changes can lead to prediabetes remission and prevent progression to type 2 diabetes. Continue Reading »

Drug company Lilly released important results showing that the new therapy may be extremely effective for people with type 2 diabetes. Across three clinical trials, tirzepatide reduced A1C by an average of 2.5 percentage points and led to a weight loss of about 25 pounds. Continue Reading »

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