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Time in Range

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Cherise Shockley shares how she decided to switch from DIY Loop to Control-IQ, and what she learned along the way. Continue Reading »

What does it mean to experience hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia? How can you recognize the symptoms of both, intervene early, and prevent serious episodes of high and low blood sugar? Continue Reading »

In this video on understanding your ambulatory glucose profile (AGP) report, pediatric endocrinologist, Dr. Amy Criego from the International Diabetes Center, uses real-world AGP examples to show how small steps and manageable goals can lead to more Time in Range.  Continue Reading »

Fitbit’s new glucose tracking feature allows users to log blood glucose meter data alongside activity, sleep, food, and more in the Fitbit app. Learn how your daily habits affect your glucose trends. Continue Reading »

The American Diabetes Association recommends SGLT-2 inhibitors or GLP-1 agonists for people with heart and kidney problems, the use of Time in Range in diabetes management, and continuous glucose monitors for all people with diabetes on multiple daily injections or pump therapy. It also encourages healthcare professionals to consider social determinants of health, refer people to diabetes self-management education services, and reduce barriers to care.  Continue Reading »

Keeping glucose levels in a tight range is more important than ever during pregnancy. Dr. Sarit Polsky discusses glucose management and target glucose levels, as well as the benefits of using continuous glucose monitors (CGM), for pregnant women with diabetes.  Continue Reading »

COVID-19 vaccines are being distributed in the United States and in many parts of the world. We’re here to answer questions for people with diabetes. Are the vaccines safe? How do the vaccines work and does it matter which one I get? What are the side effects, and how will the vaccine affect my blood sugar? What can I do after I am vaccinated? Continue Reading »

Average A1C values differ between racial and ethnic groups – people of color have a higher average A1C compared to white people. This is because someone’s A1C value could potentially reflect more than just their average glucose level. A1C values are also influenced by differences in survival rates of red blood cells and how sugar attaches to them.  In addition, because A1C does not provide any specific information about glucose variability or hypoglycemia, it is important to consider using other personalized metrics to better assess diabetes care. Continue Reading »

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