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Mental Health

Taking care of one’s mental health is equally as important as taking care of one’s physical health – especially for people with diabetes. Diabetes management can be overwhelming and even exhausting at times, and can lead to diabetes distress or fatigue, depression and anxiety, and other emotional health challenges. The shame and blame felt by people with diabetes can also be particularly challenging. Thankfully, you are not alone. The most important thing you can do is advocate for yourself – find a mental health professional and the support system you need on your diabetes journey.

What's new

Weight impacts diabetes and diabetes impacts weight. The emotional and physical toll of excess weight is not exclusive to the type 2 diabetes community as diaTribe staff member, Julie Heverly explores.  Continue Reading »

Researchers are investigating if increasing positive affect – the feelings of being happy, cheerful, or proud of your accomplishments – can help teens with type 1 diabetes develop more adaptive coping strategies for their diabetes distress. Continue Reading »

Diabetes is complex and difficult, but a strong support group can help young adults get through it.  Find out the advantages of a peer support group and where to find them. Continue Reading »

Scott Johnson, a community leader on diabetes, speaks with diaTribe's Cherise Shockley about his decision to write about his diabetes and mental health. He explains the advantages and disadvantages of sharing his journey on online platforms and the importance of sharing your own story. You can watch the interview here Continue Reading »

Adolescence can be a confusing time, and this is doubly true for teenagers with type 1 diabetes. At a stage when everyone is starting to figure out who they are, the teenager with type 1 must also decide how much they want diabetes to be a part of their identity. Katie Bacon, the mother of a teenager with type 1, spoke with a range of experts and peers who shared their expertise and experiences on this subject. Continue Reading »

Time in Range (TIR) is another number for people with diabetes to pay attention to and use to improve their daily diabetes management. We talked with three women in the diabetes community about how they use TIR as a helpful number to keep them on track and inform their care. Continue Reading »

The Your SAY: Hypoglycemia study is a 30-minute online survey that will help an international research team understand how severe low blood sugar affects quality of life – for people around the world living with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and their loved ones. Continue Reading »

What is resilience and why are people with diabetes better prepared to develop it? Scott Johnson shares what he’s learned about how to build resilience and channel diabetes distress. Continue Reading »

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