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Medication & Treatment

People with diabetes use many medications to both manage blood sugar levels and also to prevent or treat health complications.

For people with type 1 diabetes, the most important drug is insulin; some people with type 2 diabetes also take insulin. For people with type 2 diabetes, glucose-lowering medications include metformin, sulfonylureas, TZDs, SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and more.

Some of these drugs are injected, others are taken in pill form, and some are even inhaled. Learn about the different treatment options available and which might be best for your lifestyle.

Metformin
Insulin
SGLT-2 inhibitors
GLP-1 agonists
DPP-4 inhibitors
Combination drugs
Sulfonylureas (SFUs)
TZDs

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