Skip to main content

Medication & Treatment

People with diabetes use many medications to both manage blood sugar levels and also to prevent or treat health complications.

For people with type 1 diabetes, the most important drug is insulin; some people with type 2 diabetes also take insulin. For people with type 2 diabetes, glucose-lowering medications include metformin, sulfonylureas, TZDs, SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and more.

Some of these drugs are injected, others are taken in pill form, and some are even inhaled. Learn about the different treatment options available and which might be best for your lifestyle.

Metformin
Insulin
SGLT-2 inhibitors
GLP-1 agonists
DPP-4 inhibitors
Combination drugs
Sulfonylureas (SFUs)
TZDs

What's new

Metformin is the world’s most common diabetes medication and can improve diabetes management. Research suggests that metformin might lead to weight loss in certain people – read more to learn about this common claim.  Continue Reading »

The FDA approved Ozempic for a 2.0 mg dose, which was based on clinical trial data showing the higher dose led to a better A1C and to weight loss. Continue Reading »

Jardiance Chronic Kidney Disease

Early trial results found that SGLT-2 inhibitor Jardiance is highly effective at preventing and treating kidney disease in people with or without type 2 diabetes. Continue Reading »

lower morning blood sugar levels

Trying to learn how to lower morning blood sugar? Here are the reasons why your glucose levels rise in the morning and how you can keep them in range. Continue Reading »

having type 1 and type 2 diabetes

As a response to several different factors, some individuals with type 1 diabetes can also develop characteristics of type 2 diabetes. Find out what may put you at risk and how you can try to prevent and manage ‘double diabetes.’ Continue Reading »

Civica, a nonprofit pharmaceutical company, announced plans to make generic insulin available for $30 per vial or $55 for five prefilled pens, regardless of insurance status. Continue Reading »

US pharmaceutical companies and insulin manufacturers react to proposed legislation that would cap insulin costs and prevent significant rises in the costs of prescription drugs. Continue Reading »

diabetes myth busting cures

Products claiming to treat or even cure diabetes are everywhere, but do these so-called ‘cures’ really work? Spoiler alert: the answer is usually no. Treatments for diabetes need to be FDA-approved to ensure they are safe and effective. Here we discuss spices, natural supplements, and other methods claiming to cure diabetes. Continue Reading »

Pages