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Medication & Treatment

People with diabetes use many medications to both manage blood sugar levels and also to prevent or treat health complications.

For people with type 1 diabetes, the most important drug is insulin; some people with type 2 diabetes also take insulin. For people with type 2 diabetes, glucose-lowering medications include metformin, sulfonylureas, TZDs, SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and more.

Some of these drugs are injected, others are taken in pill form, and some are even inhaled. Learn about the different treatment options available and which might be best for your lifestyle.

Metformin
Insulin
SGLT-2 inhibitors
GLP-1 agonists
DPP-4 inhibitors
Combination drugs
Sulfonylureas (SFUs)
TZDs

What's new

Heart failure is one of the most common diabetes complications. New results from the EMPEROR-Preserved clinical trial show that Jardiance could be the first medication shown to help all people with heart failure. Continue Reading »

If you are currently taking three or more insulin injections per day, you may be eligible to participate in a clinical trial that provides you with the Guardian Connect continuous glucose monitor (CGM) system, InPen smart insulin pen, and smart insulin pen caps. Continue Reading »

Insulin pumps included in the Medtronic MiniMed 600 series and remote controls in the 500 series have been recalled due to a device malfunction that can result in incorrect insulin dosing and cybersecurity risks in the remote controls. If you have one of these devices, stop using immediately and fill out a request form for a free replacement. Continue Reading »

Results from recent clinical trials have shown that GLP-1 receptor agonist medications are effective at lowering A1C and body weight.  Continue Reading »

diaTribe is excited to bring you additional expanded coverage from the EASD 2021 virtual conference this past week! Find out more from leading clinicians and researchers around the world on insights into the latest data on automated insulin delivery, diet and nutrition, SGLT-2s, GLP-1s, and chronic kidney disease. Continue Reading »

Weight management is no easy task, but achieving and maintaining a healthy weight is important for your well-being, your diabetes management, and your overall health. Continue Reading »

The FDA and the FTC sent warning letters to 10 companies falsely claiming to sell dietary supplements that could cure, treat, mitigate, or prevent diabetes. People are strongly encouraged to avoid these products until they have undergone the proper testing. Continue Reading »

Kerendia (also known as finerenone) can reduce the risk of heart attacks, hospitalization for heart failure, and cardiovascular death for adults with chronic kidney disease in people with type 2 diabetes. Continue Reading »

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